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Live Art Class Resources

This page is a repository of resource links to practices explored in my seminar series on Live Art.

Links to the work of: Jill Orr, Lyndal Jones, One Step at a Time Like This, Aphids, PVI Collective, Jason Mailing, Benjamin Cittadini, Robert Wilson, Rimini Protokoll, Duncan Speakman, Marcus Coates, Fish & Game, Persis-Jade Maravala & Zecora Ura, Janet Cardiff, Punchdrunk, Lone Twin, Gob Squad, Forced Entertainment, Ant Hampton, Amy Spiers and Catherine Ryan, Field Theory.

Please contact me with suggestions for extending the list and with errata.

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Welcome to Melbourne

Guest post welcoming international delegates to PSi 2016 Performing Climates July 2016 

As an immigrant to the world’s most ‘liveable’ city it is my pleasure to share a couple ideas for things to do before, after or during the conference that might give you a sense of where you have landed. Here are a couple of personal suggestions, maybe one will take your fancy.

Wominjeka, you are on Boonwurung and Wurundjeri Land…

Australia is home to the world’s oldest continuous human cultures. Taking the time to engage with the many facets of indigenous culture will provide the most distinctive and satisfyingly Australian experience of Melbourne. One of the best ways to do this as a tourist is to take a walk led by an indigenous guide, this will change the way you see the city, the faces around you and Australia’s flora and fauna. The Koorie Heritage Trust offers several walks, and I can recommend the Birrarung Falls Walk. Also The Royal Botanical Gardens offers an Aboriginal Heritage Walk through one of the finest parks in the world. If you don’t have time to book into a walk, or Melbourne’s winter is keeping you indoors, visit the First Peoples exhibition at the Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Melbourne Museum, it’s brilliant.

Botanical Gardens and Shrine of Remembrance (free)

After a long flight it is good to get outside. If it is not raining head to Royal Botanical Gardens and wander until you get lost amongst the plants that are often kept in greenhouses in other countries. It is a brilliant park with trees from around the world. The Shrine of Remembrance  on the edge of the park offers stunning FREE viewing platform with arguably the city’s best vista. Almost all the trams from the university go there directly: 3, 5, 6, 8, 16, 64, 67, 72. Get off at ‘Shrine of Remberance’ or ‘Domain Interchange’. Couldn’t be easier.

Penguins and St Kilda (free)

Few Melbournians are aware that penguins can be seen in at the end of St Kilda pier at dusk. Yet somehow every new visitor and tourist knows to make the pilgrimage to encounter the Little penguins  The sunset in the water and the view back to the city is particularly impressive at dusk and you are 90% guaranteed to see a penguin. Have a walk along the wintery beach and into Claypots St Kilda for a seafood dinner afterwards. Take tram 3a, 16 and 96 to St Kilda Beach.

Flinders Lane Cocktail Crawl

What better way to see Melbourne than through a martini glass? For a true night on the tiles you only need to come to my street, Flinders Lane where I’ve lived for the last five years. Follow these simple instructions. Arrive at the 55th floor Lui Bar at 5:30pm, order a house-infused macadamia nut vodka cocktail and take your seats for sunset and the breathtaking view. Once the sun and second cocktail have gone down, so should you. Head along Flinders Lane (or catch the tram on Collins 3 stops) and attempt to find Eau De Vie a speak easy with no sign on the door, no windows and only a Narnia-esque street lamp to indicate passage to higher spirited world. It is worth searching out their brilliant flaming cocktails to shake off your winter chill. Once warmed keep going past all the tempting eateries to the very end of the Flinders Lane, and find another secret door into Hihou a brilliant, small Japanese bar, and ask for a booth. Hihou overlooks Treasury Gardens, a prime possum hangout (see Possums). Three amazing award-winning cocktail joints on one straightforward crawl.

Possums (free)

Ever met a marsupial? This is your time. You can’t come all this way without seeing one. Koalas, kangaroos, wallabies and wombats all live wild nearby Melbourne and can be easily spotted if you hire a car. But even in the city you can see a possum, which are loathed by Australians but beloved by visitors. More feline than their American cousins, and far cuter, just head out to a park at dusk and you will see them on the ground and in the trees.

Markets and Brunch

The Queen Victoria Markets sprawl between the edge of the CBD and North Melbourne. It’s huge and worth visiting to see the amazing fresh produce and to pick up a bargain from the clothes and ambient goods section, which includes souvenir stalls. There is A LOT to eat there and is an easy walk from campus. At least once in your visit you should go for a good brunch. Australians take brunch to another level with some seriously innovative thinking going into mid-day concoctions. See the separate food guide we put together for you, or search out a few of the top spots. My rank order would be The Grain Store,  Hardware SocieteAuction Rooms and Proud Mary (the last two also particularly good for coffee too).

Day Trips or Longer

If you are thinking about bigger trips I would suggest the following. The best thing to do is hire a car with some friends and take your time. But there are also organised day trips with Gray Line.

Healesville Sanctuary and Yarra Valley (animals and wine in the countryside)

See the animals at the sanctuary and then travel round the vineyards sampling as you go. Easily done in a day with one sober driver, even better to stay over somewhere with an open fire.

Great Ocean Road (animals, rainforests and beaches)

One of the finest stretches of road in the world. Get out to some unspoilt beaches, rugged cliffs, rainforest and maybe even the Twelve Apostles. It is possible to get to the Apostles and back in one long day, but better to stay over. Or just go to Cape Otway and then come back. There are a few places where you can almost always see kangaroos, koalas and platypus. Just ask if you are going.

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Launch dates for “It’s All Allowed: The Performances of Adrian Howells”

Deirdre Heddon and Dominic Johnson’s new book about the performance work of Adrian Howells will launch this year. I contributed a small chapter on Adrian’s pedagogy and can’t wait to read the rest this brilliant book cover to cover.
Launch dates:
Gilmorehill Centre, Glasgow, Saturday 18 June, 7.30pm
BAC, London, Monday 4 July, 7.30pm
Get your order in now at www.intellectbooks.com
"All these pictures of the world should not be allegories of infinite mobility and interchangeability but of elaborate specificity and difference and the loving care people might take to learn how to see faithfully from another's point of view, even when the other is our own machine."
Donna Haraway 1988, 'Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective', Feminist Studies, vol. 14, no. 3, p. 583

Simon Wilkinson ‘Transmedia Immersion’ Lecture – ACMI – Melbourne – Part 1

Simon Wilkinson presents his work and ideas on transmedia immersion. Recorded at ACMI [Australian Centre for the Moving Image] – Federation Square, Melbourne 10:03:15

Presented by Federation Square as part of their Creative Programme, Hosted by Robert Ellis Walton [VCA]

"Forget about good. Good is a known quantity. Good is what we all agree on. Growth is not necessarily good. Growth is an exploration of unlit recesses that may or may not yield to our research. As long as you stick to good you’ll never have real growth."
AN INCOMPLETE MANIFESTO FOR GROWTH by Bruce Mau
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John Cage: Some Rules for Students and Teachers

RULE ONE: Find a place you trust, and then try trusting it for awhile.

RULE TWO: General duties of a student – pull everything out of your teacher; pull everything out of your fellow students.

RULE THREE: General duties of a teacher – pull everything out of your students. 

RULE FOUR: Consider everything an experiment.

RULE FIVE: be self-disciplined – this means finding someone wise or smart and choosing to follow them. To be disciplined is to follow in a good way. To be self-disciplined is to follow in a better way.

RULE SIX: Nothing is a mistake. There’s no win and no fail, there’s only make.

RULE SEVEN: The only rule is work. If you work it will lead to something. It’s the people who do all of the work all of the time who eventually catch on to things.

RULE EIGHT: Don’t try to create and analyze at the same time. They’re different processes.

RULE NINE: Be happy whenever you can manage it. Enjoy yourself. It’s lighter than you think.

RULE TEN: “We’re breaking all the rules. Even our own rules. And how do we do that? By leaving plenty of room for X quantities.” (John Cage)

HINTS: Always be around. Come or go to everything. Always go to classes. Read anything you can get your hands on. Look at movies carefully, often. Save everything – it might come in handy later.

– Thanks to Dave Richmond for passing these on.

– See list of Survival Techniques: Advice for Day 1

"Show up. Pay attention. Tell the truth. Don't be attached to the results."
Angeles Arrien via Phelim McDermott via Deborah Richardson-Webb & David Richmond
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Aung San Suu Kyi Speech on World AIDS Day 2013

I found myself directly in front of Aung San Suu Kyi at the 2013 World AIDS Day launch on December 1.  It was an amazing day and I was humbled to be there. Here is  Daw Suu’s speech which I transcribed from a video I shot (available on request). I thought it might be useful to post the full speech online.

I was invited to this event at Government House as VCA Theatre are working with Living Positive Victoria to commission two new works for AIDS 2014 inspired by the ENUF stories.  AIDS 2014 will be the biggest conference ever held in Australia with an expected 20,000 international delegates.  The two new works will be developed by third year BFA Theatre Practice students directed by two brilliant Melbourne directors, Maude Davey and Noel Jordan. BFA Production students will collaborate on the design and realisation of these works.

Aung San Suu Kyi is Chairperson of the National League for Democracy, Burma, and UNAIDS Global Advocate for Zero Discrimination. She is also a Laureate of The Nobel Peace Prize.

Read on for highlights and the full transcript of Daw Suu’s speech.

"We must have our differences and we must recognise them, but these differences should be an opportunity to be more complete human beings. [...] I do believe in a distinction between the mind and the heart. The mind, of course, is a little bit more calculating. First of all look to the people you truly wish to help, then I think the heart must take first place. There must be less aggravation and more warmth, more love, more affection, more compassion. You never know when you will need it yourself."
Aung San Suu Kyi, 1 December 2013, Government House World AIDS Day Launch, Melbourne

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