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Notes on A 24-Decade History of Popular Music Chapter III

By Taylor Mac, at Melbourne Festival

Wed 11 – Fri 20 October | Forum Melbourne

Get tickets here

Notes on the notes:

  • These are notes, not a review.
  • I’ve never used my blog for this kind of writing before. I’m giving it a try.
  • Leave a comment if you like.
  • I may write more after each part of the show. I might not. I might type this up into something more formal. Or not.
  • Taylor Mac uses “judy”, lowercase, not as a name but as a gender pronoun.

See Notes on Chapter I | See Notes on Chapter II 

Chapter III: 1896-1956

18 hours in, 6 more to go.

The turn of the 20th century, two world wars and the 50s in one night. I was called up to the stage with all the other people who identified as men between the ages of 16 and 40 to go and linger in a trench with some rats and a single bottle of rum which I never got to taste. It was very uncomfortable and squashed but of course that was the point. There were a lot of us and we hardly fit. The lights were dazzling and the whole experience disorienting. I could hardly hear the instructions through the speakers, and so kept getting things wrong. Up there, between the double bass and the drum kit I realized that for Taylor the music is in surround sound, the stage, of course, is completely immersive, its own little world quite different to the perception of it from the audience where the sound all comes from one direction. As Taylor’s rendition of Danny Boy got lot louder and louder, it got to the point where Taylor was completely drowned out. I was immediately behind judy, but couldn’t here judy’s voice because the speakers were pointing out into the audience. I wondered how Taylor could hear judy, or perhaps judy could not. All of this reminded me just how different the experience of the production on stage is to the reception in the audience. The way Taylor holds it together in overwhelming moments like that is through the discipline of training. For me it was a war zone.

The war songs made me realise that this the whole event is Music Hall, it’s a variety show. Keep The Home Fires Burning was always the penultimate song at the Music Hall shows my family took me to as a child, often in seaside towns. It was the tear-jerker before the final number when all the acts came on. They also sometimes had a medley of war songs and would run through them, the audience singing along as they sped through. I don’t recall ever going to Musical Hall or variety show since then. What brought me out was Taylor Mac’s epic idea for 24 hours. Apart from cruises and holiday camps (but there aren’t so many of the latter any more) where else does variety take place, and why would you go?

When I first encountered Taylor Mac, judy was a troubadour, travelling around singing about love and life, building an audience on the experimental theatre circuit, doing something no-one else seemed to be doing at the time and singing a lot. There were shows where it was basically a spot light on Taylor’s face for an hour lighting down to a little ukulele. The sequins on the facial expressions were the whole set and enough to keep you enraptured song after song. Now, the scale is extended to a whole orchestra and costume after costume, but at the centre it is still Taylor’s body doing all this work, gelling all the glitter together. Tonight, as the final band members leave the stage I imagine we will see that ultimately none of the glitz was necessary. The core of the whole experience is that Taylor can and will hold the whole room in the palm of judy’s hand. There will be nothing left other than all there ever was.

It’s two hours before Chapter IV and I still haven’t had time to discuss the shape of the whole event, the preservation and careful metering of performance energy, and the occasional moments when Taylor seems to let rip, like in the fast version of ‘Turn, turn, turn’(?!) at the end of Chapter III. Maybe tomorrow?

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Notes on A 24-Decade History of Popular Music Chapter II

By Taylor Mac, at Melbourne Festival

Wed 11 – Fri 20 October | Forum Melbourne

Get tickets here

Notes on the notes:

  • These are notes, not a review.
  • I’ve never used my blog for this kind of writing before. I’m giving it a try.
  • Leave a comment if you like.
  • I may write more after each part of the show. I might not. I might type this up into something more formal. Or not.
  • Taylor Mac uses “judy”, lowercase, not as a name but as a gender pronoun.

See Notes on Chapter I

Chapter II: 1836-1896

12 hours in, 12 hours still to go. It happened to me again. The day after Chapter II all I could talk about were the images in the show that kept flashing back in my mind. Did all that really happen? Now it feels like it all slipped by in the blink of an eye. Oh yeah, in hour four we went to Mars to perform the whole of The Mikado, as setting it anywhere on Earth is a version of blackface, but no-one knew how we got there from an All-American Sunday dinner. Who knew Gilbert and Sullivan were such a central part of the American cannon? But still, I don’t have much time to write this, and so, again, can’t go into detail on the songs themselves. I just have time to talk about two things

Of Course, It’s a Course! (Or maybe a trial)

I realized that a 24 hour history of USA told through popular song is more like a course than a performance. It’s the same length of contact time as a semester-long subject at the University. Delivered intensively, it’s an immersion course for re-writing American history from a post-gender, post-race, post-patriarchal perspective, and a general how-to for queering life in general. All the materials from history, the songs, are scrutinized through the lens of the ‘radical faery realness ritual’, and every whiff of misogyny, racism and hatred of difference of any kind is wafted front and centre. No-one survives unscathed. Songs are sometimes analysed line by line, or redone in style appropriate for its content that might just scrape by. Other songs are not to be applauded, as their invidiousness may be wrapped in a sweet jingle, and the bitterness of the lyric not felt until spelled out after the fact. So maybe it’s a trial of America’s past by the standards of today, which is to say of Taylor Mac’s standards, and so not the mainstream standards of today, but some future vision of a world in the process of being re-inscribed. Or maybe, like real trials, it is about justice plain and simple. Justice for the wrongs of the past still perpetrated in the present. In looking to the past, Taylor Mac points out where the utopian dream of USA went wrong. We are presented with the future of the past. Maybe this is how it will be told from now on?

Queer Space

To me, it the auditorium during these shows feels like a safe-space for diverse self-expression, gender non-conformity, and post-normative bodies. It is a popular space in the sense that the subject of the show is popular culture. The rules are looser, and transgression, reimagining and rebellion is encouraged. You can wander in and out, drink, talk, interact, change seats. Taylor wanders around the auditorium and seems able to sing on any perch, lap or railing. [The criticism alleging dilution of queer culture through popularizing or main-streaming to reach a broader audience that has been leveled at Taylor Mac is a discussion for another time]. The atmosphere of permission is quite different to most other theatre shows. Towards the end of Chapter II Taylor asked us to remove all the chairs. The notion of a sit-down audience where you rent a seat, some more expensive than others, has now gone completely. The audience is now on their feet or wheels and moving constantly. This is how it ended on Friday. Will the chairs have returned since then?

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The Best of Great Ocean Road On A Google Map

A few years ago I made this map of my favourite places along the Great Ocean Road for my friends. I’m sharing it now so that it is easy to find. It shows :

  • where native animals can be pretty reliably sighted,
  • some of the best beaches, waterfalls and forests,
  • recommended places to stay overnight,
  • places to eat,
  • points of interest.

Click on the icons for more info about each place. If you have any suggestions for additions please put them in a comment below.

If you can’t see the map click here

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Notes on A 24-Decade History of Popular Music #1

By Taylor Mac, at Melbourne Festival

Wed 11 – Fri 20 October | Forum Melbourne

Get tickets here

Notes on the notes:

  • These are notes, not a review. I am not interested in writing a review.
  • I’ve never used my blog for this kind of writing before. I’m giving it a try.
  • Leave a comment if you like.
  • I may write more after each part of the show. I might not. I might type this up into something more formal. Or not.
  • Taylor Mac uses “judy”, lowercase, not as a name but as a gender pronoun.

There have been press reviews of the show already –after only 25% of the show has taken place. (Imagine how ridiculous it would be for another show to be reviewed a quarter of the way through without acknowledging such partiality.) This is one of the reasons I decided to publish these notes, which are not a review. I wanted to see how my understanding of the show, the people around me and my sense of self shifted over a 24 hour of exposure to Taylor Mac’s show. I want to remember the lacuna, the place between the installments where I have to try to decompress after six intense hours of riotous chaos and bravura performance. Right now it is three hours before the second installment will begin. I spent a lot of yesterday in a daze, the length of the show messed up my circadian rhythm, it infected my night’s dreams and held my day dreams to ransom. Did I really run my fingers along that person’s teeth when I fed them a grape when we were both blindfolded (or as least I was)? What was the name of the person I ended up next to again? Was the US founded on a hatred of the US, and loving black hair, and, and..? It is too much to process. But I’m giving it a try.

Chapter I: 1776-1836

Wow, this is the perfect venue for this show. Even going to the toilet feels like theatre. The show has already begun even before any of the performers are on stage. There are hundreds of people milling about. They look really cool. I’m sat at the back of the stalls, but right in the middle. I can see all the audience as well as the stage. I introduce myself to the person sat next to me. We are both seeing the whole 24 hours. Maybe we will become friends?

When Taylor gets on stage for Amazing Grace, the opening song, I have a surreal feeling of time standing still. I have seen judy perform many times before in Glasgow, London and Melbourne, and just got that strange feeling of being connected through performance to all those other moments and stages in my life, and all the emotions I felt, laughing heartily and crying my eyes out in the comfort of the audience surrounded by my beloved friends. But comparison is violence, so I decided not to equate those previous times with this.

There was an unorthodox acknowledgement of country followed by a meeting of Timothy White Eagle and Aunty Di Kerr. Aunty Di offered a welcome to country and acknowledged Taylor’s apology on behalf his ancestors, offering a possum skin wristband imbued with a creation story. She said she had only started making things recently. What a gift.

The first member of the audience on stage was told they were a verb not a noun. That is, like the rest of the audience and all present, in the act of becoming themselves, building their lives, and at the same moment creating this performance together. This struck me as a central theme in Taylor Mac’s work. An early show  (The Be(a)st of Taylor Mac?) was based on judy’s creation story. As an artist, a person, a leader Taylor Mac has continued to create judy as consciously as possible over many years since then. This is the central queer gift that Taylor Mac embodies and promulgates: we are all in the process of creating ourselves, and it is possible to do some of that transforming consciously and mindfully. It is also key to understanding the politics of the performance space and the calamitous gel that holds the event together: the show is alive, and being made in the moment by all those present. Part is made, part makes itself. There was a plan, and now there are tactics. Ultimately, of course, this is why addressing the creation of USA as a nation over 24 hours of song is so well matched to Taylor Mac’s queer dramaturgy: while a country seems to have become an intransigent noun, it was always, despite what you may have been led to believe, always a transitive verb. As we rebuild ourselves out of calamity, so might we rebuild our communities, and if we must, a whole country, more mindfully.

This is an epic queer show happening in Melbourne at what feels like a calamitous time for LGBTQ+ individuals and communities. And yet, despite the ridiculous postal survey, and completely coincidentally, it has been the queerest of weeks for me (and maybe others like me, and maybe for the whole of the arts in Melbourne) and that is incredibly exciting. On Saturday at the Melbourne Town Hall just a few hundred meters from The Forum, the inaugural Coming Back Out Ball took place. The CBOB was a major event in the life of the city as well as for the senior queers who graced it. Likewise in another bastion of the establishment The Fairfax theatre, All The Sex I’ve Ever Had was a kind of queering of old age, a late-life outing of all the dirty little secrets, peccadillos and loves that dare not speak their name. I’m exhausted. It’s all happening at once, hour after hour of transformative performance that undoes perceptions of bodies, lives and love.

Obviously, I am in a rare and privileged position able to participate in all this great work. Many others are not. Like the man I interviewed at the Coming Back Out Ball, who came to Melbourne from regional Victoria alone and on-spec after reading an story in a local newspaper. He hadn’t booked in advance but turned up with his paper clipping and was not turned away. He was glad to be there but wondered why he had to come all the way to Melbourne to experience such an event. Things haven’t changed so much where he is from. And what would his old friends say, the five who died of AIDS in the ’80s? He remembered one lost friend in particular who would have loved the CBOB and we shed a tear together for him in the corner of the biggest party in town.

And what about cost? How could anyone but the extremely wealthy afford a $690 ticket for A 24-Decade History of Popular Music? Not many people. Of course the whole thing should be free and be taking place at MCG, but as it is not, what should be the cost? What value do you put on something that lasts 24 hours and features 150 professional performers? It’s a scale we are completely unaccustomed to in theatre. This show’s endeavour is in the same order as long-form TV series (and they cost a lot more). It could be performed as 24 one hour shows at $30 each. But no, it should be binge-watched, like we do TV (sometimes), in six-hour blocks, because of the (almost) physical impossibility of performing it in one 24 hour go, which has only happened once. In the end lots of tickets were released at lower rates, many paying $60 per night ($10 per hour). I’d hate for discussion of cost to become a legacy of this work in Melbourne. It’s obvious that a show of this scale is impossible without vast levels of funding, but this is why we have Melbourne Festival, to make extraordinary things happen. It’s a completely unprecedented kind of work and so its funding and ticketing scheme are equally novel but certainly not as interesting as the endeavour itself.

Even the six hour block was dizzying. I am still not sure how it is humanly possible to keep all those songs, monologues and gags so pristinely in one’s head, and to stay ‘on message’ so astutely and coherently. And then I remember that for judy, this is life, that is the message. It is not only a performance, but a lived experience, a part of life for someone who has already performed for thousands of hours all around the world. Judy wasn’t built in a day, but over many years through a life lived as consciously as possible. Machine Dazzle might make the frocks, but machine judy lives them. But the term ‘machine’ is too inhumane for Taylor Mac’s creation, which is wrought from the deepest humanity, and the most radical desire for us all to become the most fabulous, fair and forgiving version of ourselves.

There is so much more to say! About the queering of the space (I’ve said a little about time), by causing calamity, moving the front row around immediately (maybe the people who paid the most for their tickets), and allowing free movement throughout the show (I watched the last hour from row two). About the Dandy Minions constantly provoking transformation around you. From further back you could see them better, creating movement and colour throughout the audience, dragging the stage into the world. And of course, about what is actually happening on stage, you know, the entire history of USA in song. It is every show in one. But really, it is life on show, a series of possible lives. And over 24 hours, you might just have time to reconsider yours.

It is now one hour before Chapter II.

Live Art Class Resources

This page is a repository of resource links to practices explored in my seminar series on Live Art.

Links to the work of: Jill Orr, Lyndal Jones, One Step at a Time Like This, Aphids, PVI Collective, Jason Mailing, Benjamin Cittadini, Robert Wilson, Rimini Protokoll, Duncan Speakman, Marcus Coates, Fish & Game, Persis-Jade Maravala & Zecora Ura, Janet Cardiff, Punchdrunk, Lone Twin, Gob Squad, Forced Entertainment, Ant Hampton, Amy Spiers and Catherine Ryan, Field Theory.

Please contact me with suggestions for extending the list and with errata.

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Welcome to Melbourne

Guest post welcoming international delegates to PSi 2016 Performing Climates July 2016 

As an immigrant to the world’s most ‘liveable’ city it is my pleasure to share a couple ideas for things to do before, after or during the conference that might give you a sense of where you have landed. Here are a couple of personal suggestions, maybe one will take your fancy.

Wominjeka, you are on Boonwurung and Wurundjeri Land…

Australia is home to the world’s oldest continuous human cultures. Taking the time to engage with the many facets of indigenous culture will provide the most distinctive and satisfyingly Australian experience of Melbourne. One of the best ways to do this as a tourist is to take a walk led by an indigenous guide, this will change the way you see the city, the faces around you and Australia’s flora and fauna. The Koorie Heritage Trust offers several walks, and I can recommend the Birrarung Falls Walk. Also The Royal Botanical Gardens offers an Aboriginal Heritage Walk through one of the finest parks in the world. If you don’t have time to book into a walk, or Melbourne’s winter is keeping you indoors, visit the First Peoples exhibition at the Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Melbourne Museum, it’s brilliant.

Botanical Gardens and Shrine of Remembrance (free)

After a long flight it is good to get outside. If it is not raining head to Royal Botanical Gardens and wander until you get lost amongst the plants that are often kept in greenhouses in other countries. It is a brilliant park with trees from around the world. The Shrine of Remembrance  on the edge of the park offers stunning FREE viewing platform with arguably the city’s best vista. Almost all the trams from the university go there directly: 3, 5, 6, 8, 16, 64, 67, 72. Get off at ‘Shrine of Remberance’ or ‘Domain Interchange’. Couldn’t be easier.

Penguins and St Kilda (free)

Few Melbournians are aware that penguins can be seen in at the end of St Kilda pier at dusk. Yet somehow every new visitor and tourist knows to make the pilgrimage to encounter the Little penguins  The sunset in the water and the view back to the city is particularly impressive at dusk and you are 90% guaranteed to see a penguin. Have a walk along the wintery beach and into Claypots St Kilda for a seafood dinner afterwards. Take tram 3a, 16 and 96 to St Kilda Beach.

Flinders Lane Cocktail Crawl

What better way to see Melbourne than through a martini glass? For a true night on the tiles you only need to come to my street, Flinders Lane where I’ve lived for the last five years. Follow these simple instructions. Arrive at the 55th floor Lui Bar at 5:30pm, order a house-infused macadamia nut vodka cocktail and take your seats for sunset and the breathtaking view. Once the sun and second cocktail have gone down, so should you. Head along Flinders Lane (or catch the tram on Collins 3 stops) and attempt to find Eau De Vie a speak easy with no sign on the door, no windows and only a Narnia-esque street lamp to indicate passage to higher spirited world. It is worth searching out their brilliant flaming cocktails to shake off your winter chill. Once warmed keep going past all the tempting eateries to the very end of the Flinders Lane, and find another secret door into Hihou a brilliant, small Japanese bar, and ask for a booth. Hihou overlooks Treasury Gardens, a prime possum hangout (see Possums). Three amazing award-winning cocktail joints on one straightforward crawl.

Possums (free)

Ever met a marsupial? This is your time. You can’t come all this way without seeing one. Koalas, kangaroos, wallabies and wombats all live wild nearby Melbourne and can be easily spotted if you hire a car. But even in the city you can see a possum, which are loathed by Australians but beloved by visitors. More feline than their American cousins, and far cuter, just head out to a park at dusk and you will see them on the ground and in the trees.

Markets and Brunch

The Queen Victoria Markets sprawl between the edge of the CBD and North Melbourne. It’s huge and worth visiting to see the amazing fresh produce and to pick up a bargain from the clothes and ambient goods section, which includes souvenir stalls. There is A LOT to eat there and is an easy walk from campus. At least once in your visit you should go for a good brunch. Australians take brunch to another level with some seriously innovative thinking going into mid-day concoctions. See the separate food guide we put together for you, or search out a few of the top spots. My rank order would be The Grain Store,  Hardware SocieteAuction Rooms and Proud Mary (the last two also particularly good for coffee too).

Day Trips or Longer

If you are thinking about bigger trips I would suggest the following. The best thing to do is hire a car with some friends and take your time. But there are also organised day trips with Gray Line.

Healesville Sanctuary and Yarra Valley (animals and wine in the countryside)

See the animals at the sanctuary and then travel round the vineyards sampling as you go. Easily done in a day with one sober driver, even better to stay over somewhere with an open fire.

Great Ocean Road (animals, rainforests and beaches)

One of the finest stretches of road in the world. Get out to some unspoilt beaches, rugged cliffs, rainforest and maybe even the Twelve Apostles. It is possible to get to the Apostles and back in one long day, but better to stay over. Or just go to Cape Otway and then come back. There are a few places where you can almost always see kangaroos, koalas and platypus. Just ask if you are going.

Festival of Live Art Program is Launched

Excited to be part of this amazing biennial festival right here in Melbourne!

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2015 Season 2 Arts House Events

Artists Q&As

Very excited to be meeting new artists as well as reconnecting with practices I have been following for years at the talks at Arts House this season. Looking forward to seeing you there.

SDS1 by Ahil Ratnamohan – Saturday 22 August 5pm
Confusion for Three by Jo Lloyd – Thursday 27 August 7:30pm
All Ears by Kate McIntosh – Friday 4 September 7:30pm
A Drone Opera by Matthew Sleeth – Friday 11 September
Dance of the Bee by Martin Friedel and Michael Kieran Harvey – Saturday 12 September
Piece for Person and Ghetto Blaster by Nicola Gunn – Thursday 12 November

Visit Arts House’s Website and Book Now!

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John Cage: Some Rules for Students and Teachers

RULE ONE: Find a place you trust, and then try trusting it for awhile.

RULE TWO: General duties of a student – pull everything out of your teacher; pull everything out of your fellow students.

RULE THREE: General duties of a teacher – pull everything out of your students. 

RULE FOUR: Consider everything an experiment.

RULE FIVE: be self-disciplined – this means finding someone wise or smart and choosing to follow them. To be disciplined is to follow in a good way. To be self-disciplined is to follow in a better way.

RULE SIX: Nothing is a mistake. There’s no win and no fail, there’s only make.

RULE SEVEN: The only rule is work. If you work it will lead to something. It’s the people who do all of the work all of the time who eventually catch on to things.

RULE EIGHT: Don’t try to create and analyze at the same time. They’re different processes.

RULE NINE: Be happy whenever you can manage it. Enjoy yourself. It’s lighter than you think.

RULE TEN: “We’re breaking all the rules. Even our own rules. And how do we do that? By leaving plenty of room for X quantities.” (John Cage)

HINTS: Always be around. Come or go to everything. Always go to classes. Read anything you can get your hands on. Look at movies carefully, often. Save everything – it might come in handy later.

– Thanks to Dave Richmond for passing these on.

– See list of Survival Techniques: Advice for Day 1

"Show up. Pay attention. Tell the truth. Don't be attached to the results."
Angeles Arrien via Phelim McDermott via Deborah Richardson-Webb & David Richmond

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